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It’s about time.

I don’t know what my problem was with not having posted any butter coffee recipes. I kind of, stupidly, assumed that everyone knows how to make it already. I forget that there are people who live outside of my butter-filled-bubble. When it gets to the point that people go out of your way to tell you that they have, finally, put butter in their coffee, that’s a sign that it’s time to just post your recipe already.

So why? Why the butter coffee? Here’s the cliff notes:

While some tout it as a weight-loss meal replacement, or a miracle cure all that will heal and fix ALL of your problems…that’s not what I use it for.

I use it as part of my balanced and whole foods nutrition plan. I actually don’t recommend using it as a meal replacement/weight loss tool. There are between 200-254 calories in my butter coffee, depending on the day. If I have two of those instead of meals, I’m only looking at 500 calories. It’s actually easy to end up consuming too FEW calories when having butter coffee, especially as a meal replacement which can get in the way of healthy fat loss. I adjust what goes into my coffee based on what else is on the plate.

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Had with breakfast (Which yes, I do recommend be adjusted accordingly. For example, on days I’m having a butter coffee WITH breakfast, I’ll usually have half of the amount of meat and only one egg OR have a full breakfast and cut the butter/oil in the coffee in half. When I wasn’t including eggs in my diet, I definitely had a nice big Butter Coffee with my breakfast), it will keep me alert, satiated and full unit my next meal.

Part of why I like it with breakfast is because I generally feel better when I keep carbs to the later meals in the dy, primarily at dinner.  I find I get ‘snacky’ pretty soon after breakfast if it’s carb heavy instead of fat/protein heavy. It also makes for a good ‘snack’ when I’m a little peckish at that weird time of day when breakfast is long gone and lunch is on the horizon. When I train in the mornings, I can’t eat much. I generally feel nauseous if I eat too close to the gym, but feel depleted if I have nothing. A butter coffee works great for me in that scenario. Screw neon colored ‘pre-workout’ shakes. No thanks. This does me just fine.

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It’s a way for me to enjoy my coffee, milk-free, with a few added benefits like a nice smack of the fat soluble vitamins A, D, and K as well as colon-friendly butyric acid that comes in grass fed butter. The coconut/MCT oil provides me with brain fuel for improved cognitive function, as well as its gut-healing antimicrobial/antifungal properties. These fats together not only get the caffeinated effect flowing faster, but they help control its metabolization, preventing the caffeine crash. Slow and controlled. All thanks to fats.

Here’s the thing: Butter coffee is not NECESSARILY for everyone! Just because someone told you that you should drink it, doesn’t mean you should. Everyone is different and there is no such thing as a one-size fits all approach. You have to figure out what works for you. If you drink it, and you feel like shit, stop drinking it! If you drink it and you feel awesome, get down with it! It’s not blindly doing something you read about. We have to self-experiment and find our own sweet spot. Is butter in your coffee right for you? Well, it depends. The same can be said about coffee. Is coffee good? Is it bad? Well, it depends. That’s for another day. I digress..

My recipe doesn’t vary much from that of the other butter-coffee-drinkers out there. It seems we all have our own little tricks and twists on the same basic idea. I actually do get asked quite often HOW to make it, so here’s what I do:

To start, I keep the butter or ghee (I pretty much exclusively use Tin Star these days, as it’s casein and lactose free) destined for coffee in a glass tupperware container at room temperature. It prevents it from becoming a cooling agent in the steaming hot coffee. I also preheat my blender and mug by filling it with hot water while I make the coffee. I know, I’m anal.

Brewing methods

I used to use K-Cups, which I’ve happily abandoned. Sure, they’re good for really fast coffee, but I think they make a weak and watery brew. Plus they’re kind of gross. My preferred method of brewing, in order are:

1. Chemex  or pour over

This is by far the slowest process, but yields the smoothest cup-o-joe. It’s my favorite way to make coffee. You get none of that sludgy darkness at the bottom of the pot. Just crystal, beautiful, coffee. It’s the best way to get the most out of your coffee. It’s pricey, but if you use it daily like I do, it’s well worth it.

2. Aero press

This is what I use when I’m in a pinch for a quick single cup. It brews faster than the Chemex and doesn’t require the hands on participation that my top choice does. The steep, then air pressure filtered method gives you a very smooth cup and it can also be daily used for a great espresso. Cheap, easy, and great results.

3. French Press

Not my ideal choice, as it always leaves some bitter sludge on the bottom. Careful not to pour out EVERYTHING when making a French Press. This is my choice for when I need a quicker pot for more than just myself. It takes about 4 minutes to brew and you end up with something much better than what would’ve come out of your automatic drip.

On to the buttery goodness. This is my base recipe. The one I generally have daily. From here, I mix it up. Adding cacao butter or powder, vanilla, peppermint…but not maple syrup or sugar. Honestly, I’m not trying to make glorified Frappucinos. I don’t think we should be starting out day with a big hit of sugar – organic and natural or not. It’s also my understanding, that by adding sugar/carbohydrate to the butter coffee, that we are interfering with it’s desired effects: quicker, yet more stabilized caffeination, MCTs as brain fuel, healthy fats for blood sugar stability and hunger satiety…all of that good stuff gets negated when you turn it into a milkshake. All of my variations are flavorful and delicious without taking away from their fatty goodness.

For the sake of this recipe, I will reference using a blender. You can do this with an emersion blender, or even shake the shit out of it in a Hydroflask or mason jar.D

Do you HAVE to use a particular band of coffee, MCT oil, or collagen? NO! I use a locally roasted, organic and fair trade coffee. If you have access to coffee like this, I always recommend supporting local businesses. It IS important, though, to get organic coffee as it’s an extremely high pesticide crop. It’s becoming increasingly important, in my opinion, to source fair-trade products when it comes to coffee and chocolate. There are some real human rights issues happening and if we care how the animals we eat are treated, shouldn’t we care how HUMANS are being treated?

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Here’s my basic recipe.


 

Basic Butter Coffee

Basic Butter Coffee
Serves 1
The basic recipe for a creamy and delicious butter coffee.
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Ingredients
  1. 12-16 oz hot brewed light or medium roast coffee (organic, fair trade ideal)
  2. 1 tsp - 1 tbsp unsalted grass-fed butter or ghee
  3. 1 tsp - 1 tbsp MCT oil or coconut oil
  4. 1-2 tbsp gelatin protein / collagen hydrolysate
  5. pinch himalayan sea salt
Instructions
  1. Simply put everything into a blender and blitz it on a medium to high speed for 20-30 seconds. I believe this time is what makes my butter coffee better than when others make it. Giving it that full 20-30 seconds really allows the fats to fully emulsify and allows lots of air to get in, creating a much creamier texture.
Notes
  1. The sea salt doesn’t add much by way of flavor, but it replenishes some minerals as, no matter what, coffee is a diuretic and dehydrates us. A little bit of celtic or himalayan sea salt helps to mitigate that a bit.
The Girl With The Butter http://www.thegirlwiththebutter.com/

Simply put everything into a blender and blitz it on a medium to high speed for 20-30 seconds. I believe this time is what makes my butter coffee better than when others make it. Giving it that full 20-30 seconds really allows the fats to fully emulsify and allows lots of air to get in, creating a much creamier texture.

The sea salt doesn’t add much by way of flavor, but it replenishes some minerals as, no matter what, coffee is a diuretic and dehydrates us. A little bit of celtic or himalayan sea salt helps to mitigate that a bit.

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I’ll be posting some variations soon, like iced mocha, peppermint, spiced, and whatever else I come up with, but this is the butter coffee I have every day.

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